Posts Tagged 'anthropology of science fiction'

Anthropology in Outerspace

Anthropology in Outerspace

TGA’s exciting new fall series will examine representations of anthropology in science-fiction. Emma, Marie-Pierre and Rayna will discuss cases from various TV series, movies and books and what they reveal about popular perceptions on this science and its branches (archeology, linguistic anthropology, biological anthropology and sociocultural anthropology).

There’s still time!

There’s still time!

You can still submit your proposal for the panel Nick Mizer, myself and other colleagues are planning for the American Anthropological Association (AAA) 2013 annual meeting. Check here for more information on the panel about geek anthropology and send your proposal before April 10th!

We look forward to hearing from you!

– The Geek Anthropologist

What I wish I could unlearn from Star Trek TNG / 1: Women are equal to men. In theory.

What I wish I could unlearn from Star Trek TNG / 1: Women are equal to men. In theory.

Since my blog’s creation last September, I have written about my (anthropological) perceptions of science-fiction on a few occasions.

In From Science-Fiction to Anthropology: there and back again, I described in detail the curiosity Star Trek and other sci-fi franchises have sparked in me for otherness and extreme alterity. This, I believe, is one of various elements that led me study anthropology, which in turn, brought me to be much more critical of the themes science-fiction explores.

First Japan, then Mars: Percival Lowell’s fascination with alterity

First Japan, then Mars: Percival Lowell’s fascination with alterity

Last week I posted about the relation between my passion for science-fiction and my career in anthropology. I stated that as I was growing up, I often challenged myself to imagine how aliens would look like if they were drastically different from humans. I also expressed my feeling that science-fiction authors, despite trying to imaging extreme otherness in the form of aliens, rarely create something that differs from the Western conceptions of what sentient beings are.