Posts Tagged 'anthropology of geek culture'

Shadows of the Past: Rings of Power’s Complicated Penumbra

Shadows of the Past: Rings of Power’s Complicated Penumbra

Rings of Power fails to lean into the possibility of moral ambiguity, instead reproducing the same simplistic binaries between good and evil. For the Elves, the inherent “goodness” of their race, and their purpose on Middle Earth is eminently visible, communicated through the sheer beauty of their people, their clothes, their architecture, their relationship to nature. Even more disturbingly, Rings of Power also reinforces cultural narratives that equate deformity with evil through the character of Adar, a “corrupted” Elf or Uruk.

Spider-Man: No Way Home and the Problems of Magic Bullet Heroism

Spider-Man: No Way Home and the Problems of Magic Bullet Heroism

While I admire the decision to try to help each of Spidey’s foes—particularly since the Avengers have never met a problem they don’t try to punch their way out of—the curative ideal that Spiderman peddles tells us a lot about how the US in particular addresses public health problems, the medical and social ills that the country chooses to “cure” or address through vertical, top-down tactics.

Screen Memory, Social Distancing & Speculative Fiction: The Geek Anthropologist 2021 in Review

Screen Memory, Social Distancing & Speculative Fiction: The Geek Anthropologist 2021 in Review

2021 gave us new ways to think about virtual presence and digital connection through Minecraft; the role of a mediated and mediatized grief in Wandavision; the Marxist politics underlying GameStop stock; the ongoing importance of centering repatriation in the practice of archaeology; and the bureaucratic magic of Loki.