Online communities

My life of playing Starcraft (or at least 14 years of it)

My life of playing Starcraft (or at least 14 years of it)

Day[9] (Sean Plott) has been playing Starcraft since the moment it hit the market in 1998: it’s been 14 years.

He played Starcraft: Brood War professionally and qualified for the World Cyber Games in 2004, 2005 and 2006. He won the Pan-American tournament in 2007. Since then, he has worked as an e-sports commentator for Starcraft II tournaments and, since 2009, has been casting a daily show called the Day[9] Daily. You can watch his videos on Youtube, on his website or tune in live on Twitch five days a week.

Living in video games and living life like a video game

Living in video games and living life like a video game

I got hooked on World of Warcraft the first time I played it.

The game had been online for years when I first set foot in Azeroth in 2009. I had heard of the game of course, and was fascinated by the fact that it’s economy had expanded from game to Ebay. In China, some people worked in WOW “factories” where they played to create top-level characters that could later be sold to lazy players. I had also heard of some extreme cases in which people had gotten so addicted to it, that they stopped going to school or work for weeks or months.

The Internet has your back Colleen Lachowicz (and so does this level 69 Blood Elf Hunter)

The Internet has your back Colleen Lachowicz (and so does this level 69 Blood Elf Hunter)

Greetings Geekverse!

I was resting yesterday as it was Thanksgiving in Canada. I would like to catch up today by sharing this story I have been following since Friday morning when a friend of mine posted this BBC news article on his Facebook feed. Maine’s Democrat candidate Colleen Lachowicz is being attacked by her Republican opponent, Tom Martin, because she is a World of Warcraft (WOW) player.

Geeks and nerds: some representations

Geeks and nerds: some representations

As I mentioned in my first post, it is essential to define words such as “geek“, “geek culture” or “nerd” before I proceed in this enterprise of the anthropological study of geek culture and online communities. So in the following few weeks I will be posting research material I use to build clearer definitions of these concepts as well as the definitions themselves. The first concepts we will be exploring is those of ”geek’, and ”nerds” as they are central to the project that underlines this blog. In addition, there is an ongoing debate on the deep meaning of these words and, more importantly, on whether there is actually any difference between the two. Some of the most interesting images I found so far on the topic are on this pinterest board. Enjoy!