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Review / 1: Cheating: gaining advantage in videogames by Mia Consalvo

Review / 1: Cheating: gaining advantage in videogames by Mia Consalvo

I admit without shame that I often cheat when I play video games:  I have skipped missions on Starcraft when loosing repeatedly became too frustrating. I don’t think I have ever played Quake on anything else than Godmode. Cheating allows me to manipulate the game experience, exploit the aspects of it I enjoy the most and free myself from some of the more demanding aspects when I don’t enjoy them. 

However, because I cheat to enjoy easy and fun gaming, I would not go out of my way to cheat. Additionally, I would not cheat if the game-play is enjoyable and rewarding. And I have found that cheating can rob you of some of the best rewards games have to offer. When I got stuck on the final stage of Portal 2, I looked up a walk-through and ended up discovering the final step without wanting to: to this day, I wonder what kind of amazement I would have felt had I been able to figure it out for myself.

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How fun and games can make a better world, and a better you

How fun and games can make a better world, and a better you

Among the most common comments about people who like playing video games is that they are wasting their time. In fact, after her first TED talk, in which she argued that video games can make a better world, Jane McGonigal started receiving this comment, in this form or another, repeatedly:  on your death-bed, are you really going to wish you’d spent more time playing angry birds?

My life of playing Starcraft (or at least 14 years of it)

My life of playing Starcraft (or at least 14 years of it)

Day[9] (Sean Plott) has been playing Starcraft since the moment it hit the market in 1998: it’s been 14 years.

He played Starcraft: Brood War professionally and qualified for the World Cyber Games in 2004, 2005 and 2006. He won the Pan-American tournament in 2007. Since then, he has worked as an e-sports commentator for Starcraft II tournaments and, since 2009, has been casting a daily show called the Day[9] Daily. You can watch his videos on Youtube, on his website or tune in live on Twitch five days a week.

Living in video games and living life like a video game

Living in video games and living life like a video game

I got hooked on World of Warcraft the first time I played it.

The game had been online for years when I first set foot in Azeroth in 2009. I had heard of the game of course, and was fascinated by the fact that it’s economy had expanded from game to Ebay. In China, some people worked in WOW “factories” where they played to create top-level characters that could later be sold to lazy players. I had also heard of some extreme cases in which people had gotten so addicted to it, that they stopped going to school or work for weeks or months.